Please post your thesis statement/thesis paragraph for the Pilgrimage of Grace DBQ.  Remember the Iron Rule of Advanced Placement---AP=Answer the Prompt!!
 


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Nehal
10/02/2011 07:54

The Pilgrimage of Grace was the first multi-class rebellion in 1536 England. It was ignited by King Henry VIII's decision to change England from a Catholic to a Protestant country for the meek reason of not getting his marriage annulled. The confiscation of church properties, closure of monasteries, and collection of all the Catholic Church's lands and money made many people irate. The act that actually ignited the rebellion was Henry VIII's Act of Supremacy; document that all church officials had to sign that declares Henry the superior head of the church. When some church officials were imprisoned and executed for refusing to sign the Act of Supremacy, people revolted. There were different reactions to Henry VIII's decision to change England into a Protestant nation; some people had no problem converting to Protestantism to support the King while others who wanted to remain Catholic, get back the Catholic Church's monasteries and money, and redeem the Pope as the head of the Church participated in the Pilgrimage of Grace.

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Sabira
12/07/2013 08:13

You forgot to include Cromwell.

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Farida
10/02/2011 11:16

The Pilgrimage of Grace was one of the most popular uprisings in the reign of Henry VIII. It was mainly waged against the Act of Supremacy and the policies that followed. Both the participants in this pilgrimage and those who opposed them, had a number of goals and concerns. The participants had concerns with the policies f Henry VIII as well as the economy under his reign. Their goals were to annul the heresies of people such as Wycliffe and Luther, to restore monasteries, houses, and lands, to have the Pope be the head of Church, and to have Thomas Cromwell, the Lord's chancellor, punished. The opposition, on the other hand, were satisfied with things the way they were and feared that this rebellion would get out of hand. That's mainly why most of the participants in the Pilgrimage of Grace were executed for treason, even though they were doing this in the name of God and their king.

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Arpita Patnaik
10/02/2011 11:20

The declaration that King Henry VIII would be the head of the Anglican Church and to change England from a Catholic to a Protestant country commenced the Pilgrimage of Grace. Not only were people angry with the religious perspective but also the manner in which he issued the decree. But the major reason was ‘The Act of Supremacy’ that inaugurated the Pilgrimage. The ‘Act’ stated that Henry VIII himself would head the Anglican Church. There were many Catholic Church officials who did not sign it as a result they were put to death. There were people who were intolerant of a single word against Catholicism. They strongly disagreed with Henry VIII and revolted. They wanted the Church, their land and money back as well as the Pope to guide the church and its members. However there were a number of people who supported King Henry VIII for two reasons - firstly, they supported Protestantism and believed that the King was justified in his decisions, secondly they were frightened of His Highness’ powers and what he could do to them.

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Sarah
10/02/2011 11:22

In 1534, the Act of Supremacy made King Henry VIII head of the Anglican Church of England. This launched the beginning of what is known as the Protestant Reformation. Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII’s Lord High Chancellor and head of the King’s Council, implemented various governmental policies including the expansion of royal power in the north of England, new taxes, dissolution of monasteries, and the confiscation of Catholic Church lands. This angered the people of England and they formed armed demonstrations, as well as staged protests from October 1536 to February 1537. This rebellion was known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. Those who opposed this uprising were Henry VIII and his political advisors. Henry VIII’s decision to make England a Protestant nation triggered people’s emotions, making them willing to fight to remain Catholic, not have Henry VIII as the head of the Church, and fight for their land back.

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James
10/28/2013 18:18

Wow that was ridiculous...You copied the Historical Background almost word for word and just switched the order. Forget about Advanced Placement, a 6th grader could do better.

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Zachary
10/02/2011 11:46

There are many concerns and goals of contributors in the Pilgrimage of Grace, and who opposed it. It started in 1534 when King Henry VIII became head of the Anglican Church, due to the Act of Supremacy. This marked the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in England. Henry VIII’s Lord High Chancellor and head of the King’s council was Thomas Cromwell. Thomas made several governmental policies. The polices included; new taxes, expansion of royal power in the north of England, dissolution of monasteries, and the confiscation of Catholic church lands. The marchers, or peasants, reacted to this and created demonstrations and protests. This would be known as the Pilgrimage of Grace, from October 1536 to February 1537.

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Farah Mokhtar
10/02/2011 16:34

The Pilgrimage of Grace, a series of protests against the creation of the Anglican Church, occurred for a variety of reasons: political reasons, including the claim that the new Parliament and Thomas Cromwell held no power, as well as the fear that the new government would not defend the people against invasion or robbery; religious reasons, the most important of which was that the majority of people in the south of England were devout Catholics and would not give up their religion lightly; and economic reasons, mostly the fact that due to the Protestant Reformation, Catholic and monastic lands had been seized, leading to the economic decline of southern England. Their goals were, ultimately, to rejoin the Roman Catholic Church, thus ending the king's reign as head of the Anglican Church and getting Catholic church lands back, and to remove Thomas Cromwell from power. For the opposition, the concerns and goals were fairly simple: a revolt was occurring, and, as a threat to the King's rule, it had to be put down, whether through execution or through royal pardons; as for the goals, they simply wanted to restore order and keep the Anglican Church and the king in power.

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Arpita
10/02/2011 22:48

The declaration that King Henry VIII would be the head of the Anglican Church and to change England from a Catholic to a Protestant country commenced the Pilgrimage of Grace. Not only were people angry with the religious perspective but also the manner in which he issued the decree. But the major reason was ‘The Act of Supremacy’ that inaugurated the Pilgrimage. The ‘Act’ stated that Henry VIII himself would head the Anglican Church. There were many Catholic Church officials who did not sign it as a result they were put to death. There were people who were intolerant of a single word against Catholicism. They strongly disagreed with Henry VIII and revolted. They wanted the Church, their land and money back as well as the Pope to guide the church and its members. However there were a number of people who supported King Henry VIII for two reasons - firstly, they supported Protestantism and believed that the King was justified in his decisions; secondly they were frightened of His Highness’ powers and what he could do to them.

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Antarah
10/02/2011 23:20

Protesting has often yielded great results for those wishing for change. It also has been known to be futile, or even harmful for those who want change. The Pilgrimage of Grace was a series of protests, marches, and actions attempting to reverse the actions committed by Henry the VIII. The Pilgrimage of Grace's Primary Concerns were to annul the changes in England regarding the Church. The Pilgrimage consisted almost of Catholics wishing to revert to Catholicism. They also were discontent with the seizing of property, and overall persecution of anyone that stood in Henry's way. The Crown, mainly Cromwell, the High Chancellor to Henry VII saw it as a necessary step that all commonwealths must undergo.

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Assem Heiba
10/02/2011 23:20


Thesis
The Protestant reformation of England did not go down well with England’s common people, priests and some politicians. These people wrote poems, marching songs and letters protesting the King’s and Cromwell’s decisions. These protesters believed that the reformation was wrong, and did all that was in their power to stop the King and his council from reforming their country. The King and nobles treated these actions with warning and severity. After all, it was in their best interest to sever ties with the Catholic Church. The King pardoned the protesters in a letter, stating that he would forgive them for their “ignorance” (Doc 9).

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George
10/02/2011 23:28

The Act of Supremacy in 1534 lead Henry VII to the top of the Anglican Church. The protestant government of King Henry took land from the people of the North, including catholic churches and monasteries. The initial reason for this movement by Henry VII was that he wanted his marriage to be annulled, yet the Catholic Church wouldn't agree. He therefore created the Church of England. This Act of Supremacy greatly angered the Coatholic Northeners, who started the Pilgrimage of Grace. This movement entirely opposed the Act of Supremacy. The major goal of the Northern peasants was that some of the councilors of the king be taken out of government decision. The people of the Pilgrimage of Grace ultimately wanted the Catholic Church back, yet the Protestant government of Henry VII wanted complete control of the Anglican Church.  

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